APOC Conference Schedule

Anarchist People of Color Conference
October 3-4, 2003
Detroit, MI

Conference Schedule

Tables for Organizations are in Room 277.
Daycare is in room Hillberry C

Friday-October 3, 2003

5pm-9pm

Check-in at Room 289 in the Student Center Building at Wayne State University.

After APOCs check in at the Student Center Building, they will be given the phone number, address, and directions of where they are staying at. APOCs must stop here before they are assigned a place to stay. This is for security reasons considering Nazis are trying to disrupt the conference.

8pm-11pm
Cass Cafe

APOCs can relax and get to know each other in a relaxed environment. It is near WSU.

Saturday-October 4, 2003

Registration
9am-10am in Front of Room 289

10am-12pm
Room 289
General Body Meeting
A chance for APOCs to introduce themselves.

Lunch 12-1pm

Following Workshops at 1-2:15p.m.

Room 289

Women of Color and Feminism

Description: To facilitate discussion with women of color around our various struggles and how they relate to traditional feminism. This session would allow for open discussion in a women's only setting to openly explore issues surrounding women of color.
Presenter: Heather Ajani

Bio: Heather Ajani, who has recently moved to Albuquerque, NM, has been involved in Copwatch for over four years and is a member of Bring the Ruckus.

Room 16 (Basement)

"Karate means 'empty hand,' so it's perfect for the poor man"

Description: An interactive presentation of basic techniques, concepts, and applications related to unarmed self-protection against both armed and unarmed assailants.
Presenter: Gregory Lewis

Bio: Long-time organizer (Black Autonomy International, IWW, numerous coalitions). Certified personal trainer (ACE; Ashmead College-Seattle, WA) and Karate instructor (black belt; Kenzen Karate-Seattle, WA). Over 20 years in the martial arts (boxing, muay thai, taekwondo, karate, Brazilian jiujitsu). 10 years experience as an event staffer (i.e. bouncer). Recently fought in the local Toughman boxing competion (Tacoma, WA) and a bare-knuckle, full-contact karate demonstration (Everett, WA). Taught self-defense seminars for numerous progressive organizations including Home Alive, Anti-Racist Action, and Horizon House.
Notes: Participants will be asked about any health conditions that may affect their ability to participate. Participants are invited to videotape the seminar so they have a reference tool to take home with them (this is optional and based upon group consensus).

Room: Hillberry A

An introduction and application to Critical Race Theory for anarchists

Description: Critical Race theory originates from an activist legal perspective that strained in accepting the fundamentally reformist 'rights' perspectives of the 70's and 80's. Its roots include the fields of anthropology, sociology, history, philosophy, and politics. Notions of social construction and the reality of race and discrimination are ever-present in the writings of known contemporary critical race theorists. We will examine many of the foundational concepts of CRT with an emphasis on 'cherry-picking' those aspects that are most relevant for anti-authoritarians. This will segue into a discussion about the role of rights within movements for social change and some questions about what a reframing of this seemingly foundational concept would mean for a unified and successful social resistance.

Presenters: Ariel and Jessica

Bios: Ariel and Jessica have been members of RACE (Revolutionary Anti-authoritarians of color) http://passionbomb.com/race/ since its formation. RACE is a collective of people of color with revolutionary anti-authoritarian politics. We seek to raise critical questions about race, gender, class, sexuality, age, culture, and nature and explore how these issues intersect with the various struggles against authority and capital.

Room: 261

My Poems Wear a Skirt: Queer Women of Color Exploring Identity Boundaries, Histories and Legacies Through the Power of the Word

Description: In this session Poets María Cristina Rangel & Lenelle N. Moise will share their work as a means to incite, unite, ignite and delight attendees. The artists will perform pieces that manifest the multidimensional struggles of queer people of color in revolutionary movement(s). Believing that autobiographical work continues to offer one of the most essential forums for bridging communication between diverse communities, the artists explore challenging themes while offering no apologies: motherhood & sexuality; immigrant upbrigings and third world experiences in the US; abuse, resistance and healing; pussy, power and privilege; gender and its discontents; and offering a counter-discourse to dominant forms of imperialist/colonialist/nationalist media. Following the reading segment of this session the poets will facilitate discussion around the artistic process from creation to production to distribution with a particular eye to the power of the spoken/shared word as a means of resistance, empowerment, coalition-building, conjuring and transformation. Participants should come with their own work to share if they like as well as questions around the themes presented and how they relate to their own work, suggestions for collaboration, and the desire to establish connections with queer people of color artists and activists.

"Presenters: María Cristina Rangel and Lenelle N. Moise
Bios: María Cristina Rangel is a sinvergüenza queer Chicana mama and multi-genre writer of works for both the page and the stage. She is the recipient of the Gertrude Posner Spenser Prize in both Fiction and Non-Fiction, the Premio El Andar, the Word-Up! Award, and was selected in 2000 as one of seven playwrights from the US to attend the Inaugural US-Cuba Writers Conference where she had the opportunity to present her work in La Habana, Cuba. She has performed in venues from the Eastside to the Westside and her work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. She is currently at work on preparing her one-woman show, From a Longer Line of Vendidas, for a national tour.
"Lenelle N. Moise's art is an intense-intestinal exploration of the creative-prophetic potential of the Word. An out, Haitian-American poet, playwright, actor, visual artist and activist, Lenelle has recited from one U.S. coast to the other. She is the winner of the New WORLD Theater Poetry Slam and the Ithaca, New York 2000 Grand Poetry Slam, and in 2003, Lenelle received the James Baldwin Memorial Award in Playwriting Currently pursuing an MFA in Playwriting at Smith College, Lenelle is working on an autobiographical image-text project entitled, ARTiculation: An Open Journal Documenting This (Black Lesbian) Life. Dependencia Sexual, the feature-length film Lenelle co-wrote with Bolivian filmmaker Rodrigo Bellot, recently won the International Film Critics' Federation Award at Switzerland's 56th annual Locarno International Film Festival. Next stop for "sexual dependency" is the Toronto International Film Festival--followed by Colorado's Telluride Film Fest, and El Festival Iberoamerican de Cine Santa Cruz (where it's up for Best Screenplay).

Following Workshops from 225- 340p.m.

Room 289

"Afro-punk: The "rock n roll nigger" experience (ends at 435)

"Description: Screening of the film and Q and A or roundtable discussion about the topics addressed in the film and underground filmmaking stratagies for people of color. AfroPunk, a 66-minute documentary, explores race identity within the punk scene. More than your everyday, Behind the Music or typical black history monthdocumentary this film tackles the hard questions, such as issues of loneliness, exile, inter-racial dating and black power. It follows the lives of four people who have dedicated themselves to the punk rock lifestyle. They find themselves in situations that could only happen to some one who had to experience the duality of a person of color in a mostly white community.
Presenter: James Spooner

Bio: James Spooner came in to film making out of a passion to tell his story. As a kid, bouncing between the deserts of California and the streets of New York he was no stranger to duality. Like most kids who end up with Mohawk at 14, he had a hard time finding a home. The thing that separated him from the other kids fashioning spikes and leather was he is black. In those days, the early 90s, there was no misinterpreting the word nigger from white kids, Ebonics had not been put into vogue yet. Walking down the streets of Brooklyn you didnt see black kids with bright red hair or a ring through their eye brow. Things are different now, or so one would think

Room 261

Organizing Against Police Repression - The Police and Cruising

Description: The San Antonio cruising community is faced with a multi-tactical assault against its existence. our research documents how the San Antonio business community, conservative city leaders, and a racist police department have conspired to undermine the foundation of the cruising culture and funnel brown and black youth into the so-called criminal 'justice' system. the implications of these community destroying policies have devestating effects on our neighborhoods . . .

Presenter: Gabriel Morales
Bio: Gabriel is a 24 year old organizer born and raised on San Antonio's southside. he has been involved in developing the community organization, the Xicana/Xicano Education Project and the anti-war youth group SAYSO (San Antonio Youth Speak Out)

Room 29 (Basement)

Organizing Against Police Brutality

Description: Focus will be organizing against police brutality in Black communities. Abron will discuss her experiences as chairwoman of the International Committee to Defend the Chattanooga 3 organizing against the naked jailings of Black men in Kalamazoo, Mich.; organizing the July 12, 2003, mass march and rally against racism and police brutality in Benton Harbor, Mich.

Presenters: JoNina Abron, Lorenzo Komboa Ervin and Ron Scott
Bios: Abron has been a community organizer/activist for 30 years. For nine years, she was a member of the original Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and was the last editor of the Black Panther newspaper. Formerly, Abron was a member of the Central Committee of the National Black Independent Political Party; the Charles Briscoe Committee for Justice (anti-police brutality group in Oakland, CA); chairwoman of the International Committee to Defend the Chattanooga 3; current member of the Black Autonomy Network of Community Organizers (BANCO); and co-founder and current member of the S.W. Michigan Coalition Against Racism and Police Brutality. Ron Scott has been a community activist in Detroit for 40 years, Ron Scott has organized for the rights of low-income residents in Detroit's housing projects; co-founded the Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party; is the current
spokesperson for the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality; and is active in the anti-war movement and numerous other social justice organizations.

Room Hillberry A

From Compounds to Congress: White Nationalism in the U.S.
Description: As we begin the 21st century, nationalism has once again become a prominent feature on the national and political landscape. Across Europe, ultra-nationalist political parties have risen to prominence, sharing power presently in Austria, Italy, while building a large electoral base in France and the United Kingdom. In the United States, the counter part to these movements has been the emergence of white nationalism as a significant political phenomenon. Political and social space is being contested by white nationalists in this new period. The battles will be fought in youth subcultures, and within social spaces of American society. This presentation will explore the ideas, the broader political aims and organizing strategies of the white nationalist movement, and how anti-authoritarians can build a framework to respond.

Presenter: Eric Ward

Bio: Eric Ward has been an organizer against the white nationalist movement since 1992. He has edited three books about white supremacy; The Second Civil War, American Armageddon, and Conspiracies: Real Grievances, Paranoia, and Mass Movement. He is a contributor to the anti-fascist monthly Searchlight Magazine, published in London, England.

Following Workshops from 3:50-5:05p.m.

Room: 261

Addressing Sexism in Our Movements, Our Communities and Ourselves

Description: Facilitated discussions about internalized oppression, which will talk about constructive, concrete ways to check these -isms in anti-authoritarian movements.
Presenters: Walidah Imarisha (and others)

Room: 29 (Basement)

Watching the Right

Description: Workshop that will help attendees learn how to identify people working in right/far right/racist circles and how to combat them.

Presenter: Daryle Lamont Jenkins

Bio: Daryle Lamont Jenkins is the co-founder and spokesperson for One People's Project, an anti-racist watchdog organization that monitors and reports on right-wing activity. Established in 2000 in the aftermath of a racist rally in Morristown, NJ, One People's Project maintains records and information of not only racist groups but the individuals as well. It is OPP's intent to make certain that these groups are not allowed to function in any capacity.

Room: Hillberry B

We Got the Camera: Building Local Copwatch Groups
Description: An informational workshop with advice on how to start a Copwatch group in your area--what is needed and how to get started.

Presenter: Heather Ajani

Bio: Heather Ajani, who has recently moved to Albuquerque, NM, has been involved in Copwatch for over four years and is a member of Bring the Ruckus.

Room Hillberry A

The Human Rights Zone in the South Bronx, community alternatives to the NYPD

Description: We are looking at alternative models (Colombia's Indigenous Guard, Peace Communities) to policing in working toward community automony. We have been doing this in partnership with the Escuela Popular Norteña in looking at violence against women and applying what we have learned from Incite! Women of Color against violence. Because we live and work in a poor community of color, the same community where Amadou Diallo and Malcolm Ferguson were killed by the NYPD, and because especially young people face daily harassment and brutality by officers of the NYPD, we need to create ways to strength our community. We seek to resolve conflict on our own, without the intervention of the police, and in order for this to be realistic and for it to be a transformative reality, we need to provide community options for dealing with violence against women and understanding clearly how it is a main component of state violence. We see these as intricately connected as women, men and children of color are pitted against each other, to do the work of the state.

Presenter: Rafael A. Mutis

Bio: I am a popular educator at the Escuela Popular Norteña where I have worked together with other staff and communities since 1994 to talk about oppressions as intermeshed and resistances to them. I am involved in the LGBTST liberation movement in communities of color, as an ally to women in the women's liberation movement, and have worked with immigrants in Arizona, New Mexico and New York City. I have also done lots of work around health care, gender and sexuality issues in Nicaragua, Chiapas, Mexico, Colombia and in the U.S.

515-700pm

Room 289

Plenary Session
Chance for various proposals to be voted on.

Sunday-October 5, 2003

Following Workshops are from 9:15-10:30am

Room: Meeting in Hillberry B (Workshop is outside)

Herbs, People's Medicine

Description: We will investigate wild weeds and trees growing in the city. What plants can be used for food and medicine. How to take health care into your own hands.

Presenter: Kwah Waadabi

Bio: Kwah Waadabi is an herbalist who teaches workshops on people's medicine throughout the Northeast. He has had a private practice for ten years and ran a anarchist herb collective apothecary in Vermont. He has taught at the Avena Institute for Botanical Medicine and helped found the Boston School of Herbal Medicine. Kwah has an intimate knowledge of plant and tree medicine. It would be preferable to lead the workshop outside. We will look at plants in urban areas that could help sustain people.

Room 289

Building Multicultural Coalitions

Description: This presentation talks about the dangers and benefits of building coaltions and why it is necessary to understand the rationales behind the power structures relationship to our movement. Attendees will have a better understanding of what coalitions are, how they work and why they can be both a good and a bad idea.

Presenter: Ernesto Todd Mireles

Bio: Ernesto Todd Mireles has been doing community and union organizing for the last 12 years. In 1997, while living in Detroit, along with several other Xican@s he helped found the Xicano Development Center which is now located in Lansing, MI.

Room: 261

Liberate Our Words: Spoken Word for Liberation

Description: Liberate Our Word is a spoken word workshop geared at geeting folks there to thin about the obstacles to finding a language of liberation and working together with otyher folks there to create a new piece together as people working together to find their voices.

Presenter: Greg King

Bio: Greg King is a 22 year old youth organizer and spoken word artist originally from KY. He has been involed in youth organizing mostly in the South for the past 7 years.

Room Hillberry A

Lyrics on Lockdown: Slamming the Prison Industrial Complex
Description: A skill building session on using the arts as a tool to build awareness and mobilize communities against the prison industrial complex. This is an interactive workshop that integrates performance, dialogue, and group participation in the development of solutions to an system that is oppressing our communities.

Presenter: Piper Anderson

Bio: Blackout Arts Collective is a national organization committed to empowering communities of color through the arts, education, and activism. Founded in 1997 BAC has expanded from one chapter in New York City to nine chpaters nationwide in Boston, New Haven, New York, Philadelphia, Washington D.C, New Orleans, LA, Chicago and Houston. BAC implements youth leadership programming which integrates the arts and political education, hosts monthly performance showcases that feature the talent of community based artists of color, and launched a national anti-prison initiative called Lyrics on Lockdown in 2001 that travels to secure and non-secure detention facilities as well as community spaces to build awareness about the prison industrial complex.

Following Workshops are
from 1040-1200

Room 261

Building an Anarchist People of Color Organizing Network
Description: This will be a presentation and facilitated discussion on the creation of an anarchist people of color organizersnetwork as put in Anarchist People of Color Network Proposal.The purpose of this workshop is not to debate organization versus anti-organization politics, but to unite those who see the need for such a network to talk about the proposal and the necessity for such movement-building. This will also be the first major face-to-face discussion about this proposal, released in July.

Presenters: Ernesto Aguilar and Heather Ajani

Bios: Ernesto Aguilar is a writer and organizer active in anti-authoritarian movements since the early 1990s. He recently co-founded Houston Copwatch, and hosts the weekly Latino-issues radio show Sexto Sol on Pacifica station KPFT. Heather Ajani, who has recently moved to Albuquerque, NM, has been involved in Copwatch for over four years and is a member of Bring the Ruckus.

Room 289

The Drug War: An Anarchist of Color Response

Description: Will talk about the difference in Marxist, Anarchist, and Progressive approaches to the drug war and about strategies that we can use to defeat the police repression connected to the drug war in communities of color.

Presenter: Roger White

Bio: Roger White is a criminal justice researcher for the Data Center, a social justice research and training organization based in Oakland Ca. He's also a member of East Bay Uprising, an anti- authoritarian of color collective focused on police repression and the drug war.

Room Hillberry B

Organizing 101

Description: This workshop details the basics of community organizing with an empahsis on building capacity and momentum in tuning out people for different actions and events while developing long term organizational relationships.

After this presentation attendees will have a better understanding of the process for building organizational and organizing capacity with their respective communities.

Presenter: Ernesto Todd Mireles

Bio: Ernesto Todd Mireles has been doing community and union organizing for the last 12 years. In 1997, while living in Detroit, along with several other Xican@s he helped found the Xicano Development Center which is now located in Lansing, MI.

Room Hillberry A

Anarchists in the Palestine Solidarity Movement

Description: Anarchists have played an important role in building the Palestine solidarity movement. This will give us a chance to get to know one another, and to build ties. It will also provide a chance for us to share strategies and ideas of how we see the Middle East conflict from an anarchist's perspective.

Presenter: Student Movement for Justice

Lunch is from 1205-100

Following Workshops are from 105-220 Workshop

Room: 289

The Anti-War Movement and the Role of APOCs.

Description: A discussion on the state of anarchism and the role anarchists played during the recent anti-war movement. It will be a chance to reflect on our mistakes and successes. We will be able to discuss what APOCs have done using various strategies to build this movement around the country. It will also provide an opportunity to network with other APOCs who were involved in the anti-war movement.

Presenter: Student Movement for Justice

Room 16 (Basement)

"Karate means 'empty hand,' so it's perfect for the poor man"

Description: An interactive presentation of basic techniques, concepts, and applications related to unarmed self-protection against both armed and unarmed assailants.

Presenter: Gregory Lewis

Bio: Long-time organizer (Black Autonomy International, IWW, numerous coalitions). Certified personal trainer (ACE; Ashmead College-Seattle, WA) and Karate instructor (black belt; Kenzen Karate-Seattle, WA). Over 20 years in the martial arts (boxing, muay thai, taekwondo, karate, Brazilian jiujitsu). 10 years experience as an event staffer (i.e. bouncer). Recently fought in the local Toughman boxing competion (Tacoma, WA) and a bare-knuckle, full-contact karate demonstration (Everett, WA). Taught self-defense seminars for numerous progressive organizations including Home Alive, Anti-Racist Action, and Horizon House.

Notes: Participants will be asked about any health conditions that may affect their ability to participate. Participants are invited to videotape the seminar so they have a reference tool to take home with them (this is optional and based upon group consensus).