The Great Divide: Towards Bridging the Gap Between Anarchist- and Community-Based Organizing

This article is a few years old now but I still find its' message relevant to the tension between anarchist activism and day to day community organizing. Also check out: For Effective Organizing & Activism 2 Organizing

AWSM! An Introduction to Anarchist-Communism

So our friends in the Aotearoa Workers Solidarity Movement (http://www.awsm.org.nz/) gave a presentation to their comrades in the anarcho-syndicalist group Beyond Resistance (http://beyondresistance.wordpress.com/)

It is an intro to anarchist communism, and it is pretty AWESOME if I do say so myself!

Screening of "De Toda la Vida" July 19th - PGH NEFAC

A Free Screening to Celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Spanish
Revolution, Tuesday, July 19th, 2011,
7pm, at the Union Project,
801 North Negley Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15206

This documentary chronicles the life of the anarchist-feminist

Capitalism's Bleeding Gulf: BP’s Deepwater Horizon Explosion in the Gulf of Mexico

By Frank Rizal

With its barriers, islands, peninsulas, marshes and inlets, the Gulf Coast of the United States is known for its rich ecosystem and vast wildlife inhabiting the Gulf Coastal Plain. The region attracts many tourists who sightsee and fish along the marshlands in Louisiana, and enjoy the white sands spending their summers across the Panhandle of Florida and the barrier islands called the Emerald Coast. While experiencing the natural surroundings of the Gulf Coast, tourists can see the historical significance of the cultural heritage of the Creek Indians, French and Spanish influences that coalesced to create a unique southern gulf culture along the five states that make up the southern coast of the U.S. Indeed, tourism is a major factor in the Gulf Coast's economy, along with the fishing and shrimping industries so interconnected with the heritage along the Gulf. Yet, it only takes one disaster to turn this major tourist area that brimmed with natural beauty, vibrant culture, and contributed to a major part of the economy, into a desolate dead sea.

A Review of David Owen's "Green Metropolis"

by Jason Lewis

Possibly the most exciting book on ecology or environmentalism to be published in several years, David Owen's Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less Are the Keys to Sustainability challenges the conventional wisdom of the environmental movement and uses as a model of true sustainability, not Portland, Oregon or rural Vermont, but New York City.

Organizing Around Transit: At the Intersection of Environmental Justice and Class Struggle

by Tom Wetzel

For the older big cities in North America, public transit is critical to their daily functioning. Organizing among workers and riders on public transit has a strategic importance.

Buses, light rail cars and subway trains attract a diverse working class ridership. Workers in small factories, department stores, hospitals, and restaurants are thrown together on the bus. We encounter retirees going to a doctor's appointment, the unemployed, working class students going to classes at a community college, people of all colors and nationalities, immigrants and native-born. Organizing among transit riders allows the organizers to interact with a broad spectrum of the working class population.

A Fishy Future? Interview with a Recirculating Aquaculturist—Red Herring

Tilapia, B. Johnson"I work on what’s called a “recirculating” aquaculture farm. We’re still trying to maximize fish production, but we deal with the waste problem by closing the loop, doing our own water treatment on site and re-using as much of the water as we can. We have very high stocking densities -- let’s say twenty to thirty thousand fish, in tanks the size of swimming pools. Dozens of these tanks can fit together within one warehouse building. The water they swim in is constantly flushed out, filtered or treated in several ways, and pumped back in clean. The solids that are removed in the treatment process are stored and sold for fertilizer. So the water in the tanks “recirculates,” in parallel, and the tanks share a number of supplementary systems that help maintain an optimal growing (“culture”) environment: heating, feed, chemical regulation, and so on. We grow them for about a year, with each fish ending up as about a pound of meat when fileted. The idea is that this basic design can be scaled up to make really huge farms. Ours is a really huge farm."
Red Herring, fish farmer interviewed by Flint Arthur

An Anti-Civilization Mythology: A Review of Lierre Keith’s "The Vegetarian Myth"

I understand completely why someone might want to write a book about the “myths” of vegetarianism. We live in a world where capitalism has this amazing ability to co-opt anything and everything (you’ve almost got to admire what a good job capitalism does at that). “Green” capitalism is a case in point. Even radicals may have a hard time resisting the pull of green capitalism, though perhaps by accident. For vegans and/or vegetarians (heretofore referred to as “veg*ans”) who use their diets as a radical act, if they are promoting what to eat or not eat, buy or not buy, then there is really no way to avoid advocating for a different way of consuming—something capitalists can make loads of profit off. In addition, it’s easy to critique the idealism that some veg*ans hold: that, by way of their diet, they are not engaging in the hurting or killing of any animals, nor hurting the earth for the most part. This is of course obviously not true. Another easy critique to have of veg*ans is of their often-claimed belief that we can change the world by our diets alone; a silly idea, at best.

May Day Message of Solidarity with Imprisoned Iranian Workers

THE SCHOLARSʼ MESSAGE OF SOLIDARITY TO IMPRISONED IRANIAN WORKERS
To imprisoned workers of Iran:

Dear friends,

This yearʼs International Workersʼ Day is approaching at a time when you are in prison. We know that among you there are many like Farzad Kamangar who sacrificed his life to defend the human dignity of the humble masses that are forced to sell their labour for meagre wages. And there are many more of you who like Mansour Osanloo, Ebrahim Madadi, Behnam Ebrahimzadeh, Reza Shahabi and others, have languished in prison with many dark years still ahead simply for defending workersʼ basic human rights.

Others who have gone to prison for organizing workers have continued to be punished by the ruling legal and political regime after their release, being forced out of work and thus deprived of their only source of income, creating unbearable conditions for them and their families. The government, judiciary and intelligence machinery in Iran have proven that any attempt by workers to establish independent labour organizations and defend their livelihood will be met with swift vengeance, a fact that violates both international agreements Iran is a party to and tramples on the governmentʼs own laws.

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